Word For It. . .

2Chronicles7:14-“If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land.”

Archive for the ‘economy’ Category

States Invoking 10th Amendment/State’s Sovereignty

Posted by wordforit on March 4, 2009

Update: A page to include for clarity with a map of which states have a bill and which are in the planning stage, videos and several articles regarding State’s Rights. Let’s see where this goes!

Resource Page: State’s Rights and Sovereignty  

Whatever it takes to avoid being ruled by tyrants, so be it.

I invite you to read the article at InfoWars.com and please click on the links provided for further understanding. Our best defense, in the carnal sense, is to be armed with knowledge of what goes on around us and what our rights are as American Citizens. We need to stand for personal liberties and state’s rights, now or never! The globalists do not want us to have individualism and think for ourselves. Radio chipped driver’s license, anyone?  Thank God for those who keep sounding the alarm!

Obama’s plans for a federal handgun license, ‘hate crimes’ laws to regulate Christians’ speech about their own religious beliefs on homosexuality, President Obama’s youth corps for mandatory public service and the so-called ‘Fairness Doctrine’ to ‘balance’ talk radio have New Hampshire Lawmakers telling Obama to basically grow up and get some better ideas,” writes Jake Jones. “They say that if Obama’s plans are implimented, it would constitute a nullification of the Constitution for the United States.”

[. . .]As Obama and Congress further extend the dictatorial reach of the federal government – under the control of a small cotorie of globalists and international bankers – we can expect more states to assert their rights under the Constitution and the Tenth Amendment.”

Continue to see if your state is inclined to reject tyranny!

~~~~~~~~~~

Regarding Christian beliefs about homosexuality or any other issue that haunts us today: Several years ago I declined membership in an organization promoting the Bible as a curriculum in public schools. After prayer and consideration of all encompassing possibilities, I knew it would require that other religion’s doctrines be included and beleived it was something else that would be convoluted, therewith creating greater confusion. God is not the author oif confusion (1Corinthians 14:33).  

The last time I checked, the Bible was being taught as a history lesson is some state districts and I often wonder. . .  by whom is the lesson prepared and presented? Pagans must be overjoyed as one of their favorite claims is that the Bible is a relic or “just a history book”. . . That is my most potent contention against anything that is forced indoctrination via a ‘Fairness Doctrine’ and all the other names under which it’s currently disguised.

As you know, we cannot follow closely enough to keep up with all the destructive fireballs being thrown, therefore, be vigilant to pray without ceasing  (1Thessalonians 5:17) !

(Pre-response to commenters who think to leave something about feeling sorry for my child(ren) and how awful it must be for them [an insulting assumption to start—what if I’m childless? But lecture me, they try!]: Whatever I allow I am condoning and implicitly giving my stamp of approval. I also would not allow in my home pornography, horror movies, Harry Potter, and anything else I am aware will be the same as inviting evil. Please try many hours of Bible study and communion with God through Jesus Christ before you feel equipped to impose your accusations and “enlightenment” on Christians. If you truly begin with a humble heart, which (humble) seems to be the hesitance, you will begin to see through God’s eyes. I am not here to argue over empty and vain philosophies and implore all to read God’s love letter to hunanity, The Bible. Colossians 2:8 ~”Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments [elements] of the world, and not after Christ.” )

~~~~~~~~~~

LectLaw’s Legal Definition of Tenth Amendment:

The Tenth Amendment provides that ” The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. ” U.S. Const. amend. X. As a textual matter, therefore, the Tenth Amendment “states but a truism that all is retained which has not been surrendered.” United States v. Darby, 312 U.S. 100, 124 (1941). By its terms, the Amendment does not purport to limit the commerce power or any other enumerated power of Congress.

In recent years, however, the Tenth Amendment has been interpreted “to encompass any implied constitutional limitation on Congress’ authority to regulate state activities, whether grounded in the Tenth Amendment itself or in principles of federalism derived generally from the Constitution.” South Carolina v. Baker, 485 U.S. 505, 511 n.5 (1988). Thus, “the Tenth Amendment confirms that the power of the Federal Government is subject to limits that may, in a given instance, reserve power to the States.” New York v. United States, 505 U.S. 144, 157 (1992).

There are numbers of ways in which the federal government is permitted to secure the assistance of state authorities in achieving federal legislative goals. . . 

Continue

~~~~~~~~~~

Romans 8: 31-39~ . . .If God be for us, who can be against us?. . . 

~~~~~~~~~~

Advertisements

Posted in Christianity, culture, current events, economy, God, Jesus | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

Food Rationing Confronts Breadbasket of the World

Posted by wordforit on April 21, 2008

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif.- Josh Gerstein – Many parts of America, long considered the breadbasket of the world, are now confronting a once unthinkable phenomenon: food rationing. Major retailers in New York, in areas of New England, and on the West Coast are limiting purchases of flour, rice, and cooking oil as demand outstrips supply. There are also anecdotal reports that some consumers are hoarding grain stocks.

At a Costco Warehouse in Mountain View, Calif., yesterday, shoppers grew frustrated and occasionally uttered expletives as they searched in vain for the large sacks of rice they usually buy.

“Where’s the rice?” an engineer from Palo Alto, Calif., Yajun Liu, said. “You should be able to buy something like rice. This is ridiculous.”

The bustling store in the heart of Silicon Valley usually sells four or five varieties of rice to a clientele largely of Asian immigrants, but only about half a pallet of Indian-grown Basmati rice was left in stock. A 20-pound bag was selling for $15.99.

“You can’t eat this every day. It’s too heavy,” a health care executive from Palo Alto, Sharad Patel, grumbled as his son loaded two sacks of the Basmati into a shopping cart. “We only need one bag but I’m getting two in case a neighbor or a friend needs it,” the elder man said.

The Patels seemed headed for disappointment, as most Costco members were being allowed to buy only one bag. Moments earlier, a clerk dropped two sacks back on the stack after taking them from another customer who tried to exceed the one-bag cap.

“Due to the limited availability of rice, we are limiting rice purchases based on your prior purchasing history,” a sign above the dwindling supply said.

Shoppers said the limits had been in place for a few days, and that rice supplies had been spotty for a few weeks. A store manager referred questions to officials at Costco headquarters near Seattle, who did not return calls or e-mail messages yesterday.

An employee at the Costco store in Queens said there were no restrictions on rice buying, but limits were being imposed on purchases of oil and flour. Internet postings attributed some of the shortage at the retail level to bakery owners who flocked to warehouse stores when the price of flour from commercial suppliers doubled.

The curbs and shortages are being tracked with concern by survivalists who view the phenomenon as a harbinger of more serious trouble to come.

“It’s sporadic. It’s not every store, but it’s becoming more commonplace,” the editor of SurvivalBlog.com, James Rawles, said. “The number of reports I’ve been getting from readers who have seen signs posted with limits has increased almost exponentially, I’d say in the last three to five weeks.”

Spiking food prices have led to riots in recent weeks in Haiti, Indonesia, and several African nations. India recently banned export of all but the highest quality rice, and Vietnam blocked the signing of a new contract for foreign rice sales.

“I’m surprised the Bush administration hasn’t slapped export controls on wheat,” Mr. Rawles said. “The Asian countries are here buying every kind of wheat.” Mr. Rawles said it is hard to know how much of the shortages are due to lagging supply and how much is caused by consumers hedging against future price hikes or a total lack of product.

“There have been so many stories about worldwide shortages that it encourages people to stock up. What most people don’t realize is that supply chains have changed, so inventories are very short,” Mr. Rawles, a former Army intelligence officer, said. “Even if people increased their purchasing by 20%, all the store shelves would be wiped out.”

At the moment, large chain retailers seem more prone to shortages and limits than do smaller chains and mom-and-pop stores, perhaps because store managers at the larger companies have less discretion to increase prices locally. Mr. Rawles said the spot shortages seemed to be most frequent in the Northeast and all the way along the West Coast. He said he had heard reports of buying limits at Sam’s Club warehouses, which are owned by Wal-Mart Stores, but a spokesman for the company, Kory Lundberg, said he was not aware of any shortages or limits.

An anonymous high-tech professional writing on an investment Web site, Seeking Alpha, said he recently bought 10 50-pound bags of rice at Costco. “I am concerned that when the news of rice shortage spreads, there will be panic buying and the shelves will be empty in no time. I do not intend to cause a panic, and I am not speculating on rice to make profit. I am just hoarding some for my own consumption,” he wrote.

For now, rice is available at Asian markets in California, though consumers have fewer choices when buying the largest bags. “At our neighborhood store, it’s very expensive, more than $30” for a 25-pound bag, a housewife from Mountain View, Theresa Esquerra, said. “I’m not going to pay $30. Maybe we’ll just eat bread.”

Source:  NYSun

BY JOSH GERSTEIN (author archives) – Staff Reporter of the Sun

                      *******************

When I worked in the food industry, vast amounts of food was thrown out consistently, by customers and businesses. At the end of the day, excess prepared food would have fed several who may not have had a meal that day but, due to risks of lawsuits (e.g.,food poisoning, allergies), we were forced to discard an unGodly amount.

Wastefulness and gluttony are behaviors I strive to be conscious of not practicing, so you can  imagine how much it bothered me to watch the food waste. I honestly don’t see how any other attitude is acceptable.

Believers of God’s promises and Jesus’ return are prepared and know there is nothing to be alarmed about; mass hysteria will come from the scoffers who continue to reject the idea of God’s plan. This is an alert of the times in which we are living. Bless God.

We continue to pray for all. ~WordForIt

 

Posted in culture, current events, economy, family | Tagged: | 1 Comment »

‘Silent’ famine sweeps globe

Posted by wordforit on April 2, 2008

Amos 3:7~ Surely the Lord GOD will do nothing, but he revealeth his secret unto his servants the prophets. 

Matthew Henry’s Commentary

                               ***************

Rice, fertilizer shortages, food costs, higher energy prices equal world crisis

Source: WorldNetDaily

WASHINGTON – From India to Africa to North Korea to Pakistan and even in New York City, higher grain prices, fertilizer shortages and rising energy costs are combining to spell hunger for millions in what is being characterized as a global “silent famine.”

Global food prices, based on United Nations records, rose 35 percent in the last year, escalating a trend that began in 2002. Since then, prices have risen 65 percent.

Last year, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization’s world food index, dairy prices rose nearly 80 percent and grain 42 percent.

“This is the new face of hunger,” said Josetta Sheeran, director of the World Food Program, launching an appeal for an extra $500 million so it could continue supplying food aid to 73 million hungry people this year. “People are simply being priced out of food markets. … We have never before had a situation where aggressive rises in food prices keep pricing our operations out of our reach.”

The WFP launched a public appeal weeks ago because the price of the food it buys to feed some of the world’s poorest people had risen by 55 percent since last June. By the time the appeal began last week, prices had risen a further 20 percent. That means WFP needs $700 million to bridge the gap between last year’s budget and this year’s prices. The numbers are expected to continue to rise.

The crisis is widespread and the result of numerous causes – a kind of “perfect storm” leading to panic in many places:

  • In Thailand, farmers are sleeping in their fields because thieves are stealing rice, now worth $600 a ton, right out of the paddies.
  • Four people were killed in Egypt in riots over subsidized flour that was being sold for profit on the black market.
  • There have been food riots in Morocco, Senegal and Cameroon.
  • Mexico’s government is considering lifting a ban on genetically modified crops, to allow its farmers to compete with the United States.
  • Argentina, Kazakhstan and China have imposed restrictions to limit grain exports and keep more of their food at home.
  • Vietnam and India, both major rice exporters, have announced further restrictions on overseas sales.
  • Violent food protests hit Burkina Faso in February.
  • Protesters rallied in Indonesia recently, and media reported deaths by starvation.
  • In the Philippines, fast-food chains were urged to cut rice portions to counter a surge in prices.
  • Millions of people in India face starvation after a plague of rats overruns a region, as they do cyclically every 50 years.
  • Officials in Bangladesh warn of an emerging “silent famine” that threatens to ravage the region.

According to some experts, the worst damage is being done by government mandates and subsidies for “biofuels” that supposedly reduce carbon dioxide emissions and fight climate change. Thirty percent of this year’s U.S. grain harvest will go to ethanol distilleries. The European Union, meanwhile, has set a goal of 10 percent bio-fuels for all transportation needs by 2010.

“A huge amount of the world’s farmland is being diverted to feed cars, not people,” writes Gwynne Dyer, a London-based independent journalist.

He notes that in six of the past seven years the human race has consumed more grain than it grew. World grain reserves last year were only 57 days, down from 180 days a decade ago.

One in four bushels of corn from this year’s U.S. crop will be diverted to make ethanol, according to estimates.

“Turning food into fuel for cars is a major mistake on many fronts,” said Janet Larsen, director of research at the Earth Policy Institute, an environmental group based in Washington. “One, we’re already seeing higher food prices in the American supermarket. Two, perhaps more serious from a global perspective, we’re seeing higher food prices in developing countries where it’s escalated as far as people rioting in the streets.”

Palm oil is also at record prices because of biofuel demands. This has created shortages in Indonesia and Malaysia, where it is a staple.

Nevertheless, despite the recognition that the biofuels industry is adding to a global food crisis, the ethanol industry is popular in the U.S. where farmers enjoy subsidies for the corn crops.

Another contributing factor to the crisis is the demand for more meat in an increasingly prosperous Asia. More grain is used to feed the livestock than is required to feed humans directly in a traditional grain-based diet.

Bad weather is another problem driving the world’s wheat stocks to a 30-year low – along with regional droughts and a declining dollar.

“This is an additional setback for the world economy, at a time when we are already going through major turbulence,” Angel Gurria, head of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, told Reuters. “But the biggest drama is the impact of higher food prices on the poor.”

According to the organization, as well as the U.N., the price of corn could rise 27 percent in the next decade.

John Bruton, the European Union’s ambassador to the U.S., predicts the current trend is the beginning of a 10-15 year rise in food costs worldwide.

The rodent plague in India occurs about every half century following the heavy flowering of a local species of bamboo, providing the rodents with a feast of high-protein foliage. Once the rats have ravaged the bamboo, they turn on the crops, consuming hundreds of tons of rice and corn supplies.

Survivors of the previous mautam, which heralded widespread famine in 1958, say they remember areas of paddy fields the size of four soccer fields being devastated overnight.

In Africa, rats are seen as part of the answer to the food shortage. According to Africa News, Karamojongs have resorted to hunting wild rats for survival as famine strikes the area.

Supplies of fertilizer are extremely tight on the worldwide market, contributing to a potential disaster scenario. The Scotsman reports there are virtually no stocks of ammonium nitrate in the United Kingdom.

Global nitrogen is currently in deficit, a situation that is unlikely to change for at least three years, the paper reports.

South Koreans are speculating, as they do annually, on how many North Koreans will starve to death before the fall harvest. But this year promises to be worse than usual.

Severe crop failure in the North and surging global prices for food will mean millions of hungry Koreans.

Roughly a third of children and mothers are malnourished, according to a recent U.N. study. The average 8-year-old in the North is 7 inches shorter and 20 pounds lighter than a South Korean child of the same age.

Floods last August ruined part of the main yearly harvest, creating a 25-percent shortfall in the food supply and putting 6 million people in need, according to the U.N. World Food Program.

Yesterday, the Hong Kong government tried to put a stop to panic-buying of rice in the city of 6.9 million as fears mounted over escalating prices and a global rice shortage. Shop shelves were being cleared of rice stocks as Hong Kong people reacted to news that the price of rice imported from Thailand had shot up by almost a third in the past week, according to agency reports.

Global food prices are even hitting home in New York City, according to a report in the Daily News. Food pantries and soup kitchens in the city are desperately low on staples for the area’s poor and homeless.

The Food Bank for New York City, which supplies food to 1,000 agencies and 1.3 million people, calls it the worst problem since its founding 25 years ago.

Last year, the Food Bank received 17 million pounds of food through the Emergency Food Assistance Program, less than half of the 35 million pounds it received in 2002. And donations from individuals and corporations are also down about 50 percent, according to the report.

High gas prices, increased food production costs and a move to foreign production of American food are contributing to the problem.

 

Related offers:

Keep your money in country: “How Americans Can Buy American”

Who needs ethanol? “Black Gold Stranglehold: The Myth of Scarcity and the Politics of Oil”

Get prepared! “The Ultimate Storm Survival Handbook”

“Are We Living in the Last Days?” Get Greg Laurie’s classic prophecy primer

Previous story:

Chavez’s Venezuela a ‘tinder box’

                               ***************

Posted in Christianity, culture, current events, economy, family, God, government, politics | 4 Comments »